In this day and age, no longer can we trust games to just be games. Some apps have questionable permission requests and spy on you, some contain malware, and others take your money but don’t give you what you paid for.

Today, we’re talking about Helix Jump, an addictive labyrinth-like adventure game developed by VOODOO. Not only are their permission requests shady, but they take your money without giving you what you paid for. An ad-free, premium experience.

Just look at the reviews:

I’ve enjoyed this game, but am giving it a poor review until someone addresses my issue. I paid for ads to be removed almost a month ago and am still receiving numerous ads. I’ve emailed the development team through the Google play store, but haven’t received a response.” – Chris F.

I finally bought the premium version to avoid the ads but I’m still getting ads non stop despite reaching out to the devs who haven’t responded at all.” – Robert Clegg

“​I paid the $2.49 for ad free and I still get just as many as before. Tried contacting the developer twice in the last two days with no response.” – The Introvert Driver

“DON’T PAY FOR “NO ADS!” The ads still pop up.” – A Google User

With so many more complaints than what I’ve shown you, one can’t help wonder what’s going on behind the scenes and why they have never responded to countless e-mails from their loyal users. What is the VOODOO team really up to? Well, let’s just take a look at their permission requests…

  1. Access to photos, media, and files on your device.
  2. Your location.
  3. Making phone calls.

 

Why would a simple, old-school game need such permissions? I clicked “Deny” to see what would happen. The game loads fine. Okay, that’s nice, but that still leaves the question as to why they “needed” those permissions to begin with. Be careful of these devs, folks. Something’s not what it seems. Something’s off. You know, other than their whole vibe and everything they do. Their “business” tactics.

This reminds me very much of the whole incident with “La Liga” soccer app on Google Play. It was no simple soccer app, but a spying tool. The developers use it to spy on users to “catch illegally broadcast games.” Yeah, sure. That’s the only thing they’re doing. They have access to your microphone and have it activated. I don’t care how they choose to justify their malicious actions. Just look at their reviews.

Don’t let developers get away with shady behavior, folks. Stay alert, safe and know that there are always better alternatives!

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